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Posted 3/10/2019 6:38:27 PM
Has NO LIFE!!

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Today I,
Placed drill through five outer hub holes and drilled through plastic steering wheel and steel backing plate.
Used black silicone gasket maker and metal tape to seal all remaining holes and seams.
Steering wheel is now ready for an internal resin pour pending an interaction test between the mixed resin/hardener and the steering wheel plastic.

Interaction tests between mixed resin/hardeners and plastic materials is an important test that to ignore is at your own peril.

If the fiberglass resin/hardener I have on hand dissolves the test spot on the steering wheel plastic I will have to find another product.


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Post #162799
Posted 3/10/2019 6:46:46 PM


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Really looks good.

1. What will you use to strengthen the resin?

2. Looks like the "handle bars" are solid. Do you think they will be strong enough?
Post #162801
Posted 3/10/2019 7:31:02 PM
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sly
1. "What will you use to strengthen the resin?"

Inside the plastic steering wheel are a good number of plastic reinforcements.
I could use aluminum or steel BB shot. Or loose aluminum or steel threaded short screws as reinforcement filler.
Other possible reinforcement filler could be stripes of stainless steel or fiberglass mess.
Installed by pouring BBs and resin from separate containers, allowing them to mix as they are poured into the internal voids of the plastic steering wheel.

2. "Looks like the "handle bars" are solid. Do you think they will be strong enough?"

The handle bars are solid and feel strong. Not surprising when we realize the plastic steering wheel was designed to stand up to vigorous video simulator use.
Post #162805
Posted 3/11/2019 5:54:14 PM
Has NO LIFE!!

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sly
1. "What will you use to strengthen the resin?"
Used 200 1/4" nuts I had to fill the internal voids of the plastic steering wheel.
Hex shape and internal threading of the 1/4" nuts should give the resin something to bite into.

Fiberglass resin and hardener when mixed and poured into the internal voids of the plastic steering wheel will generate a lot of heat. Maybe, enough to melt the plastic. Once I test and verify that mixed resin/hardener won't dissolve the steering wheel plastic I will wrap it in plastic bag material and set it up in water with the pour access area above water.

Hey sly,
Have you tested any fiberglass or epoxy mixed with catalyst on the plastic steering wheel?
Any other suggestions? vertigo


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Post #162809
Posted 3/11/2019 7:37:02 PM


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Fiberglass resin and hardener when mixed and poured into the internal voids of the plastic steering wheel will generate a lot of heat.
Yes, there will be heat. I will be surprised if it's enough to melt the plastic though. Any attempt to cool the process will also increase cure time quite a bit. the heat is a necessary factor I'm afraid.

Have you thought about using fiberglass chopped strands instead of nuts? Fiberglass strands absorb the resin and would actually be stronger than the steel nuts. The steel nuts will just be incased in the resin and won't really add any strength to it. Might even make it weaker as the resin will be thinner.

Polyester resin is the easiest, fastest, and cheapest, but also the most likely to melt the plastic. You can get it at Walmart or any auto parts place. Epoxy resin would be less likely to melt the plastic but tends to be thicker so it doesn't pour as easily, takes a lot longer to cure (less heat), and it's more expensive and harder to get. You can get it online or at a boat supply shop. I would recommend the quick cure kind because it pours much better. But the words "quick cure" are relative. Link below. All resin cure times assume 70 degree temps or better. Colder temps equal longer cure times. 50 degrees = forget it.

Here is a link to a nice epoxy I would recommend (Use the 4:1 Red one on this site): http://www.uscomposites.com/epoxy.html

Here's a link to chopped strands: http://www.fiberglassfiber.com/product__1530.html
Post #162810
Posted 3/12/2019 7:50:03 PM
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Here is some information pouring epoxy/catalyst to fill voids. Appears it would also be relevant to fiberglass resin/catalyst pours.
epoxyworks.com to view complete information
Controlling Exotherm
by Mike Barnard
Occasionally customers are interested in filling a void by pouring a pouring large mass of epoxy all at once. This can be very dangerous because it will generate a lot of heat, and can lead to poor results because of the snowball effect mentioned earlier. Some faster epoxy systems, blended in a mass large enough, can reach temperatures over 400°F: hot enough to melt or at least soften plastic. This level of heat could also damage whatever the epoxy is poured into. High temperature can also result in severe cracking throughout the thickness of cured epoxy; so much so that if the epoxy were not supported, it could fall away. Shrinkage can introduce significant stresses into the structure the epoxy is attached to. Customers casting large epoxy sections into boat bilges have reported hearing loud snapping or cracking sounds after the epoxy cured.
Pouring a large mass of epoxy is a very difficult to do safely and effectively. Temperature, volume of epoxy, depth of the epoxy, and amount of heat sink in contact with the epoxy are all major variables in this application.
Proven methods for controlling exotherm:
If you do want to pour or cast a large volume of epoxy, here are several proven methods for minimizing heat buildup which we’ve developed over the years.
Pour the epoxy in timed, multiple batches.
Timing is important when doing multiple pours. Ideally, you want to wait for mild exotherm to peak and begin falling before mixing a new batch and pouring. Waiting too long could cause an insufficient bond between the two pours. Not waiting long enough can cause too much heat to build and cracks to propagate.
Choose 209 Extra Slow Hardener or G/flex
Slower cure allows a deeper pour before too much heat buildup occurs. For this reason, we recommend to use our slowest systems when casting larger amounts of epoxy: 105 Resin with 209 Extra Slow Hardener, or G/flex.
Work at cooler temperatures.
Cooler shop temperatures and cooling the epoxy itself will both work to your advantage in slowing cure and controlling epoxy’s exothermic reaction. A deeper pour can be accomplished with less heat buildup by starting with cooled epoxy and a cool substrate until the epoxy initially cures to a soft solid. Then you could expose it to room temp or higher to complete the cure.
Use heat sinks.
A heat sink is any object that can absorb lot of heat. If you are applying the epoxy into or over a heavy metal object, it will absorb much more heat than a lower-density object.
High-density fillers can also act as a heat sink, reducing exotherm by absorbing more heat than a low-density filler, and taking up more volume. This leaves less room for mixed resin and hardener, reducing the resulting heat reaction.
If the wrong epoxy/filler combination is used for a certain cure temperature, the epoxy may generate enough heat to smolder and burn. Adding more low-density filler will certainly reduce the amount of epoxy in a given volume, but the filler will act as an insulator instead of a heat sink. This effect is shown in the testing that we did.
Post #162811
Posted 3/12/2019 11:27:50 PM
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hey sly,
Thanks for the information and supplier addresses. uscomposities.com
I tested some fiberglass/catalyst mixed on some of the steering wheel plastic. It did not dissolve it. No effects.
Mixed 4 ounces of fiberglass/catalyst and after 20 minutes the bottle reached a temperature too hot to hold with the hand. I estimate the plastic steering wheel internal voids would hold around a quart of resin.
I don't think the steering wheel plastic could stand up to the exothermic effects of using that much mixed resin/catalyst.
So, after studying the products available at the company you referred to me I ordered:
KIT: 635 Thin Epoxy System with 2:1 Ratio Slow Epoxy Hardener EPOX-6355563
This seems to be exactly what I was looking for. A slow reaction with more time for heat dissipation.
Pot Life: 35-40 minutes
Set Time: 5-6 hours
Drying Time: 24-28 hours
Post #162814
Posted 3/13/2019 4:51:48 PM


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Sounds like a good plan
Post #162818
Posted Yesterday @ 7:22:16 PM
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Filled voids with chopped strands and epoxy resin/hardener.
Used laminated fiberglass cloth with resin mixed between each layer for the last 3/8" of internal void at the top area of steering wheel.


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Post #162844
Posted Today @ 10:11:27 AM
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Looks like a lot of resin poured all over the front of your wheel there vert... that has got to be nasty to fully clean up.

Why not use something like the two part putty for plumbing/filler projects. Just knead the stuff together and press it into the void... it doesn't expand, just hardens, and then is paint-able. No runny mess to deal with all over everything.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Loctite-All-Purpose-2-oz-Epoxy-Putty-1999131/206156392
https://www.jbweld.com/collections/epoxy-putty-sticks
Post #162846
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