BATMAN v SUPERMAN Dawn of Justice BATMOBILE
Batmobile Forum
 Batmobile Home          Batmobile Builders     Calendar     Who's On

Welcome Guest ( Login | Register )
        


«««12345»»»

BATMAN v SUPERMAN Dawn of Justice BATMOBILE Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted 7/31/2016 7:52:25 PM
Has NO LIFE!!

Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!


Last Login: Yesterday @ 7:55:59 PM
Posts: 3,137, Visits: 4,839
Have measured out to reconfigure my straight Tumbler arms into the movie correct angled arms.
Was not looking forward to having to use a cutting torch and cut off grinder to complete the job.
Today I happened to see this metal cutting circular saw in the Northern Tool catalog. A eureka moment for me.
I can see a lot of uses for this saw on this build.
This Milwaukee 8 in. Metal Cutting Circular Saw delivers faster, cooler, cleaner metal cutting. Forget the showers of hot metal chips and sparks that were once an aerial threat on the job. This saw shears with a virtually spark-free wake and cool, burr and scorch-free edges that don't require post-cut finishing. Metal shavings are effectively contained with a durable magnesium blade shield and channeled into the saw's integral chip tank. It makes tough cuts: up to 10-Gauge sheets and 1/4 in. steel plate cuts all day, every day. Even more extreme cuts, up to 3/4 in. steel plates, are possible. Specially formulated cermet tip metallurgy and tooth geometry ensure these incredible blades cut faster, stay sharp longer and resist more impact, resulting in less blade changes.
•Driven by a powerful 13 Amp (1-3/4 max HP), 3700 RPM motor and equipped with a full grill of razor-sharp, cermet-tip teeth
•Durable blade shield with integral chip tank deflects/collects hot chips and sparks
•Plunge lever for fast, effective plunge cuts
•Exclusive quick-release shield latch for fast waste disposal and blade changes
•2-9/16 in. cut depth for 1-pass cuts through most common materials
•Dry-cut technology provides faster, cleaner, more affordable metal cutting
•Cool cutting also means that materials can be handled almost immediately, reducing downtime
•Premium cermet-tipped blades cut faster, cleaner and longer than other carbide-tipped or friction blades
•5-year limited warranty
•Comes with carrying case vertigo



  Post Attachments 
Milwakee metal saw.jpg (9 views, 12.18 KB)
Post #150102
Posted 8/2/2016 5:01:49 PM
Has NO LIFE!!

Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!


Last Login: Yesterday @ 7:55:59 PM
Posts: 3,137, Visits: 4,839
Any reason to buy a steel cutting circular saw or dry cut saw?
Can’t I just buy the blades and use them in a regular circular saw?

No reason at all if you are independently wealthy and can afford to
waste blades and saws on a regular basis...

First: carbide saws for metal run at about 1/2 the RPMs wood saws do.
At the higher RPM speeds you often dull or strip teeth fairly
regularly. Most guys I know who have even tried the blades "rated" for
higher RPM saws haven't had good luck with the blades lasting all that
long. They cut, but blade life is dismal at best 10-20% of their rated
life at the most.

Second: the problems of lost torque and power. Metal cutting systems
are designed to work in concert for a specific purpose such that the
motors are designed to produce a high torque for power but at a lower
RPM blade speed. Metal cutting saws average 3700 rpm no load, wood
cutting saws do 5800 rpm. Adding a speed reduction system to lower the
rpm of a regular saw creates an attendant reduction in power or more
appropriately torque.

Third: the open vents are a recipe for a short circuit when cutting
metal with a normal saw.

Note you can get away with this more with aluminum than you can with
steel. Most aluminum will cut at speeds just slightly below what you
use with wood, so if you go easy, it's possible to cut alum with
carbide blades at normal wood cutting speeds. But, you are still left
with the risk of a short circuit due to open vents. vertigo
Post #150110
Posted 8/2/2016 5:08:46 PM
Has NO LIFE!!

Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!


Last Login: Yesterday @ 7:55:59 PM
Posts: 3,137, Visits: 4,839
For cutting metal where the metal cutting circular saw blade can’t reach I use these.

These are the blades of choice for use in a reciprocating saw and used by many professionals.

DIABLO-CARBIDE TIPPED-THICK METAL-RECIPROCATING SAW BLADES
6-8 teeth per inch and 6-12 inches long

Diablo's Steel Demon Carbide-tipped reciprocating blades are the first
carbide-tipped blades designed for extreme metal cutting; including
high strength alloys, cast iron, and stainless steel. This high
performance carbide-tipped blade delivers unmatched 20X longer cutting
life than standard bi-metal blades in extreme thick metal cutting
applications between 3/16 in. to 1/2 in.

The blade’s increased body height produces straighter cuts with less vibration.

High performance carbide for greater durability and cutting
performance in thick metal

Enhanced carbide tip to blade connection for extreme impact resistance

1 in. oversized blade body for straighter cuts with less vibration

Perma-SHIELD non-stick coating for less heat and friction

Ideal for cutting steel, stainless steel, cast iron, and other high
strength alloys vertigo
Post #150114
Posted 8/3/2016 2:09:41 PM


Supreme Being

Supreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme Being


Last Login: Yesterday @ 5:38:15 AM
Posts: 1,553, Visits: 4,756
Hey vert, does this circular saw your getting have adjustable depth of cut?
Post #150115
Posted 8/3/2016 4:15:57 PM
Has NO LIFE!!

Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!


Last Login: Yesterday @ 7:55:59 PM
Posts: 3,137, Visits: 4,839
It appears to have a depth adjustment in the pictures. I got these
comments off the Miller welding forum, “We have had both the 8" and
the 14" Milwaukee dry cut saws for almost 2 years and are very
satisfied with them. A slow steady feed is the key to making the
blades last, and don't let up in the middle of the cut or you will be
cutting hardened metal. For the 8" saw you should always ride the saw
against a fence, just a piece of angle clamped to the metal being cut.
Guiding the cut and not cutting free hand will make the blades last a
whole lot longer. Although it doesn't say that you can, we have cut up
to 1" steel plate with it. It's slow, but it does a great job. Harbor
Freight sells 7 1/4" metal cutting blades that will work on it. They
last, and are less than $20 each. The only "negative" I've found with
the Milwaukee, is the lack of a bevel adjustment on the saw (blade
only cuts at 90 deg to the workpiece).”
Post #150117
Posted 8/3/2016 7:27:39 PM


Supreme Being

Supreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme Being


Last Login: Yesterday @ 5:38:15 AM
Posts: 1,553, Visits: 4,756
Here's why I ask.

The DOJ Batmobile has groove lines around the top front plates. I've been trying to figure out how to reproduce those. The plates would be too big for anything but an industrial level mill and I don't think I can afford that. I don't know of a metal router and that would be risky at best. But this might work on the straight bits and then would only have to consider the curves.
Post #150120
Posted 8/4/2016 4:06:20 PM
Has NO LIFE!!

Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!


Last Login: Yesterday @ 7:55:59 PM
Posts: 3,137, Visits: 4,839
Here is a post from a professional welder on a welding site that
brings up some feed rate and cooling issues worth remembering. “Get
these blades up to speed and start into the cut carefully. If you
"jab" them you`ll break the tips off the blade. I have used 30 plus of
these blades in my welding shop and they do a great job. My first saw
cut 3/4`s of a mile of 10 gauge steel with these blades plus cutting
bottoms out of metal containers. I had to send the saw in for a
rebuild at that time. They are good for cutting thicker steel also,
but need to run blade free to cool them, like every 6-8 inches in 1/2
inch steel plate. You can cut thicker steel but you need to take your
time and air cool lots. It will cut 10 gauge almost as fast as cutting
plywood - even makes the same sound sometimes. Cuts smooth and leaves
almost no burrs and does not leave steel hot
Post #150125
Posted 8/4/2016 4:10:37 PM
Has NO LIFE!!

Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!


Last Login: Yesterday @ 7:55:59 PM
Posts: 3,137, Visits: 4,839
“The DOJ Batmobile has groove lines around the top front plates. I've
been trying to figure out how to reproduce those. The plates would be
too big for anything but an industrial level mill and I don't think I
can afford that. I don't know of a metal router and that would be
risky at best. But this might work on the straight bits and then would
only have to consider the curves.” Sly

An easy way to accomplish pronounced sharp clean groove lines in many
situations is to cut through the groove lines with a sabre saw with
fine tooth blade for 1/16” or less. For thicker metal I use a 1/8”
thick wood template pattern reduced enough to allow centering the
plasma jet shield orifice on the line, temporarily attached with a
little rubber cement, and a plasma torch. (If you need more
information, I covered plasma cutting templates, etc. in the UNIVERSAL
BAT VEHICLE: WELDING, TOOL MAKING, AND SPECIAL TECHNIQUES thread.)
Once I have the panel cut out I reduce the panel by half the width
of the groove I want, while keeping the edge corners vertical. Then I
reduce where the panel was cut from by half the width of the groove
while keeping the edge corners vertical. You could do all the groove
work on the panel alone if you accurately measured and calculated all
the cut parameters correctly. Then I cut out a piece of backer metal
that over laps both sides of the groove by 1-2 inches and weld into
place. You could also not weld in the panel, use Form a Gasket to make
a water seal, and secure with flush screws. I have not checked to see
if the real DOJ Batmobile panels are like this but I suspect they are.
Another method for thin metal is to use an air hammer, preferably with
a trigger controlled variable stroke rate, and a V shaped chisel with
the sharp edges rounded just enough to dent in but not cut the metal.
One could use a similar chisel with a hammer but the longer dwell time
of the human powered strike would introduce more distortion. Trick
with this method is to work slow enough to still have complete control
over following the lines you have drawn with a sharpie and to use
secured straight edges and template guides. Practice on similar
material is required to master this method. To cut rather than dent
the line just leave the V chisel edges sharp. I have seen grooving
done with routers before in composites, aluminum, and steel with
special bits and always with a secured straight edge or template
guide. For steel they used grinder bits. They also wore a heavy
leather welding jacket, welding gloves, and full face eye protection
(a welding helmet with clear lens) and safety glasses under the
helmet. This leads me to believe they were very concerned about their
safety when using the router method, especially with the risks of
grinder bit disintegration. Router bases are available that you can
mount die grinders and drills into to get slower speeds than the
regular router. I would suspect that one might be able to use one of
these with a variable speed drill and a small 4-flute side and bottom
cutting end mill, as long as you used very well secured straight edges
and templates to direct the directional pull of the cutter to pull
towards the very well secured edge at all times. vertigo
Post #150127
Posted 8/5/2016 5:44:40 PM
Has NO LIFE!!

Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!


Last Login: Yesterday @ 7:55:59 PM
Posts: 3,137, Visits: 4,839
hello everyone,
Spent a full eight hours today graphically experimenting with the B v S Batmobile trying to convert a 12-feet wide x 20-feet long vehicle into a dimensional street legal vehicle. Much of my time was spent in aspect bending explorations. Studied a few hundred images of art sculpture and graphic expressions of the Arkam asylum Batmobile and the Gum Ball 3000 Batmobile. When the two are compared it become quite obvious that the Gum Ball 3000 Batmobile made significant use of aspect blending. vertigo


  Post Attachments 
ARKAM ALPHA-6.jpg (12 views, 111.90 KB)
ARKAM ALPHA-5.jpg (11 views, 114.09 KB)
ARKAM ALPHA-4.jpg (7 views, 155.37 KB)
ARKAM ALPHA-3.jpg (5 views, 136.24 KB)
ARKAM ALPHA-2.jpg (6 views, 92.02 KB)
ARKAM ALPHA.jpg (8 views, 361.35 KB)
Post #150134
Posted 8/5/2016 8:22:24 PM
Has NO LIFE!!

Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!Has NO LIFE!!


Last Login: Yesterday @ 7:55:59 PM
Posts: 3,137, Visits: 4,839
hello everyone,
Ordered a couple of B v S Batmobile toys to use in my study of aspect blending for a street legal Batmobile.
One easy way to get a grasp on aspect blending for the B v S DOJ Batmobile is to study related toy vehicle copies. The usual method used to make cheaper toy copies is to simplify a detailed model with aspect blending. To me these relatively cheap toys created from aspect blending methods are logical studies in aspect blending a complex Bat Vehicle into a simpler street legal vehicle. vertigo


  Post Attachments 
ARKAM BRAVO-3.jpg (9 views, 327.35 KB)
ARKAM BRAVO-2.jpg (8 views, 201.31 KB)
ARKAM BRAVO.jpg (7 views, 32.87 KB)
Post #150138
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

«««12345»»»

Reading This Topic Expand / Collapse
Active Users: 1 (1 guest, 0 members, 0 anonymous members)
No members currently viewing this topic.

Permissions Expand / Collapse

All times are GMT -5:00, Time now is 10:58am


Execution: 0.297. 17 queries. Compression Disabled.

Batman (1989 Version)

CLTC Club Shirts




1989 Batmobile Kit 1989 Batmobile Kits
1989 Batmobile Builders Batmobile Kit
Batmobile Kits 1989 Batmobile Builder





Batman and all related characters and elements are trademarks of and DC Comics and WB.
Use of anything related to "Batman" on this site is not to infringe upon the copyrights of DC Comics or WB.
The purpose of chickslovethecar.com is to foster positive discussion about one of the greatest vehicles of all time.
This site does not sell or build any related cars or kits. © 2004-2012 chickslovethecar.com "Chicks Love The Car"
Images linked courtey of cltc.co.

You can contact us by clicking here.