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Posted 4/10/2017 6:18:24 PM
Supreme Being

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Last Login: 2 days ago @ 8:52:17 PM
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This is an old post re-posted that is still relevant to the design,
planning, and building of Bat Vehicles.
Here is the original complete listing.

WEAKEST TO STRONGEST AXLES
A listing I found in an article on off-road vehicle building

23. Chevy 10-bolt
Much like the Dana 35, it has a very weak and flexible housing that
can lead to other problems. An abused Gov-loc is a death warrant for the 10-bolt rearend. It's not a swap-worthy, full-width axle for
Jeeps.

22. '06-and-earlier Wrangler Dana 44
The smallish axletubes (same as Dana 35) can flex and cause carrier
bearing and other failures if abused. It has lots of aftermarket
support but limited available ratios if you are using the stock
Rubicon differential.

21. GM 12-bolt
Similar to the GM 10-bolt. It has a flexible housing and weak tubes
for a full-width axle. It's not really a good 4x4 axle worth swapping
into a Jeep.

20. Toyota 8-inch
Overall, it's a stout axle for its compact size. It actually makes an
OK Jeep swap, but is often frowned upon for being an import part. The
Toyota 8-inch has lots of aftermarket support.

19. Alum Dana 44 (ZJ)
It's a decent, relatively durable axle, but there isn't much
aftermarket support because it's fairly uncommon.

18. Chrysler 8.25
It's a decent axle when mated with moderate-sized tires, however, few
gear ratios are available. It doesn't have much aftermarket support.

17. Ford 8.8 (Ranger and Explorer)
Some versions have weaker 28-spline shafts. The '91-'01 Explorer
31-spline version is preferred ('95-and-later have disc brakes).
There's a lot of aftermarket support for the 8.8, but the C-clip
shafts are a notable weakness. Commonly swapped into Wranglers in
place of the Dana 35, although the marginal gain in strength hardly
seems worth the effort.

16. Toyota Land Cruiser
They're getting harder to find, but they're still usable for a Jeep in
need of an offset rearend, albeit an expensive oddball possibility
with C-clips. An offset Dana 44 from a Quadra-Trac FSJ would be a
better option.

15. Ford 8.8 (fullsize version)
All have 31-spline shafts and undesirable C-clips retaining the axles.
Not a particularly good full-width axle for a Jeep swap.

14. Dana 44 (non-Wrangler)
Much like the Dana 44 front axle, the 44 rearend enjoys a lot of
aftermarket support in the form of optional ratios, floater kits, and
aftermarket differentials for more traction. Some early models are
plagued with small bend-prone axletubes, weak coarse-spline shafts (as
well as two-piece shafts), and coarse-spline pinions. Early
'70-and-later Dana 44 rears are much more desirable. Look for 2
3/4-inch axletubes and 30-spline, one-piece shafts.

13. AMC 20 (FSJ)
The FSJ AMC 20 is stronger than the CJ version and perhaps about equal
to the strength of a newer Dana 44. However, it doesn't enjoy as much
aftermarket support as the Dana. Fewer gear ratios and lockers are
available.

12. '07-and-later Wrangler (Rubicon only) Dana 44
It features stronger tubes than the axles in the previous model
Wrangler and 32-spline shafts. It's sure to see plenty of aftermarket
support, including complete assemblies available from Mopar.

11. Chrysler 9.25
It's only found in Dodge trucks and vans. Even though it's relatively
strong, it's not all that great of a swap for a full-width axle. Very
few ratios and aftermarket differentials are available for the 9.25.
It's also a C-clip axle.

10. Ford 9-inch
It's the king of aftermarket components. The 9-inch came in Ford cars
and trucks and can be found in many configurations, lug patterns, and
widths; junkyard versions are becoming more difficult to find. Look
for the stronger 31-spline versions over the weaker 28-spline. Most
axles can be converted to stronger 31-, 33-, 35-, and even 40-spline
shafts with bolt-on parts. Plenty of differentials are available and
gear ratios ranging from 2.80:1 to 6.50:1 are easy to find. Complete
aftermarket housings and entire assemblies are available.

9. Full-floating, 30-spline Dana 60
These are extremely common and can be easily found in junkyards under
Dodges, Fords, GMs, and Jeeps alike. They are most often found under
3/4-ton vans and pickups, but a few came under Mopar musclecars. There
is a lot of aftermarket support for the Dana 60.

8. Semifloating Dana 60
It's a little rare, but it can be found under early F-150s and
early-'70s FSJ pickups. It features desirable 35-spline shafts and
uses common Dana 60 gears and carriers, so a lot of aftermarket ratios
and differentials are available.

7. Full-floating Ford 10.25
The ring gear is huge, but aftermarket support is not. The gear ratios
and differential selection is limited. Heavy use will also cause the
axletubes to break free and rotate inside the centersection. Not a
great full-width swap.

6. Full-floating 35-spline Dana 60
They enjoy plenty of aftermarket support because they use common Dana
60 gears and carriers. However, they're very uncommon, and you're not
likely to find one in a wrecking yard. Many 35-spline 60 rear axles
have been converted from 30-spline housings.

5. Rockwell 2 1/2-ton
Rockwell rear axles are often two to three times less expensive than
their frontend counterparts. The housing, gears, carrier, and bearings
are extremely durable. The 16-spline axleshafts are not. Aftermarket
shafts are available to bring it above Dana 80 strength. Only one gear
ratio and few lockers are available. Due to size, 6.72:1 gearing, and
weight, it's not a good axle for tires less than 44 inches tall.

4. Full-Floating GM 14-bolt
The 14-bolt is the king of cheap beef when running tires up to and
more than 44 inches tall. You can't deny the strength of the 10
1/2-inch ring gear, huge 30-spline pinion, and 1 1/2-inch, 30-spline
axleshafts. It also enjoys a decent number of aftermarket gear ratios
and differentials. The fact that it has a removable pinion support and
spanner adjustable backlash makes 14-bolt gear and differential swaps
relatively easy. It can be found in GM 3/4- and 1-ton trucks and vans
in a few different widths. It's often found in wrecking yards for less
than $200 because it's so common. Perhaps its only real weakness is
the thin tinfoil-like diff cover.

3. Full-floating Dana 70
The Dana 70 is another member of the cheap beef squad. However, there
are several versions making them more difficult to identify. Look for
the Dana 70U or 70HD. These feature desirable 1 1/2-inch, 35-spline
shafts. There are also plenty of ratios and a good number of
aftermarket differentials available for these versions of the 70 as
well. They are often found in 1-ton Dodge, Ford, and GM trucks, vans,
and even some tractors and heavy equipment.

2. Full-floating Dana 80
This is the step into medium-duty truck axles. The Dana 80 is more
axle than most people will ever need. There are plenty of ratios
available that range from 3.31:1 to 5.38:1 and a good number of
aftermarket differentials.

1. Full-floating Dana 135
The Dana 135 is found in some Ford F-550 medium-duty trucks and
motorhomes. It features a removable third member like a Toyota or Ford
9-inch. However, its size is more on par with an 18-wheeler rear axle.
The massive size and heavy-duty design make it undesirable for all but
the biggest-tired Jeep swaps.

The Dana 60 front axle may be the most coveted piece of off-road
hardware in the industry. It earned its reputation because of its
strength, the number of aftermarket parts available for it, and the
fact that it has remained relatively unchanged over the last 30 years.
Of course, even the mighty Dana 60 can benefit from an update every
few decades-so in 2004 Ford and Dana released the new Dana Super 60
for use in F-450 and F-550 Super Duty trucks.

Referred to internally as the "Fat Boy", the Dana Super 60 evolved
from the '78-'79 Dana 60 front axle first found under Ford F-250 and
F-350 trucks. Keep in mind the original Dana 60 was designed for a
1-ton pickup with a 4,500-pound front gross axle weight rating (GAWR),
29 1/2-inch-tall tires, 4.10 axle gears, and engines that made less
than 170 hp. The Dana Super 60 on the other hand was designed for Ford
F-550 trucks with nearly twice the weight capacity, 33-inch tires,
5.38 axle gears, and more than 600 lb-ft of engine torque.

So why should you care? Well, the new Super 60 eliminates the
weaknesses (if you can call them that) of the standard Dana 60 and
gives axle swappers a beefier front axle option to handle the largest
tires and most powerful engines. It also improves a vehicle's turning
radius thanks to its larger U-joints and steering knuckles, which
allow for a better steering angle.

When we first learned of the Super 60 we thought it would make a great
upgrade for our '02 F-250 Super Duty, which had a habit of busting
axleshafts and U-joints. Swapping in the Super 60 meant ditching the
leaf springs and converting the 10-lug axle back to eight lugs with
wheel bearings from an '05 F-350 and brake rotors from an '04 F-450.
Post #154617
Posted 4/11/2017 6:32:36 PM
Supreme Being

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Last Login: 2 days ago @ 8:52:17 PM
Posts: 1,104, Visits: 2,187
This is an old post reposted that is still relevant to the design,
planning, and building of Bat Vehicles.

The best book I have found on automotive performance welding.

Welding is an essential skill for the avid car enthusiast, car
builder, and fabricator. Engines, exhaust, intake, suspensions,
frames, all can be welded for repair and fabrication purposes. While
many introductory or entry-level welding books are available on the
market, this is the first book to comprehensively cover advanced
techniques, complex joints, advanced processes, and working with a
variety of materials, including aluminum, Chrome-moly, stainless
steel, carbon steel, titanium, and magnesium. Using the techniques
revealed in this book, you can fabricate body panels, frames, and any
number of structural and functional automotive components, and perform
structural repair. Welding projects found in this book include welding
the tubes of roll cage for strength and safety, welding sub frame
connectors for improved chassis rigidity, repairing an aluminum frame,
creating a seat support on a rod, welding in a floor pan, fabricate
body panels, frames, and any number of structural and functional
automotive components, and perform structural repair. Welding projects
found in this book include welding the tubes of roll cage for strength
and safety, welding sub-frame connectors for improved chassis
rigidity, repairing an aluminum frame. With this book, beginner to
intermediate skill-level welders will be able to improve and complete
more advanced projects.

ADVANCED AUTOMOTIVE WELDING by Gerald Uttrachi
ISBN-10: 1934709964
ISBN-13 978-1934709962
vertigo
Post #154623
Posted 4/14/2017 8:02:11 PM
Supreme Being

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Last Login: 2 days ago @ 8:52:17 PM
Posts: 1,104, Visits: 2,187
Something to seriously consider when designing, planning, and building
a Bat Vehicle.
Been spending a lot of my time looking for the right rear axle and
wheels. The most important thing that I have learned from searching
for the right wheels and axles is that the most common heavy duty axle
and wheel bolt pattern is 8 on a 6.5" bolt circle. Almost every
factory steel wheel is available in this bolt pattern and it is the
most common bolt pattern found on axles from 250, 2500, 350, 3500,
etc., etc., pickup trucks. vertigo
Post #156637
Posted 4/15/2017 8:50:27 PM
Supreme Being

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Last Login: 2 days ago @ 8:52:17 PM
Posts: 1,104, Visits: 2,187
Considering a similar axle for my DOJ build.
Bought a re-manufactured rear axle with all new internal parts for my Tumbler.
GMC 14 bolt rear axle assembly with 4.56 ratio, 10.5 inch ring gear, 8 lug, single wheel, with Detroit Locker.
Rough measurements for the the axle: wheel mounting surface to wheel mounting surface: 67 inch; backing plate to backing plate: 51 inch; center spring perch to center spring perch: 40 inches. Weight: approximately 550 lbs. This is a real beast and something the Tumbler was deserving of all along. Should be delivered to me in around 10-days. vertigo

Full-Floating GM 14-bolt
The 14-bolt is the king of cheap beef when running tires up to and
more than 44 inches tall. You can't deny the strength of the 10
1/2-inch ring gear, huge 30-spline pinion, and 1 1/2-inch, 30-spline
axle-shafts. It also enjoys a decent number of aftermarket gear ratios
and differentials. The fact that it has a removable pinion support and
spanner adjustable backlash makes 14-bolt gear and differential swaps
relatively easy. It can be found in GM 3/4- and 1-ton trucks and vans
in a few different widths. Perhaps its only real weakness is
the thin tinfoil-like diff cover.




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Post #156645
Posted 4/18/2017 5:29:10 PM
Supreme Being

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Last Login: 2 days ago @ 8:52:17 PM
Posts: 1,104, Visits: 2,187
Hey sly,

Just received this email with attachment from

www.sideshowtoy.comwhats-new/batmobile-sixth-scale/

“Batmobile Sixth Scale

Check out Hot Toy’s Batmobile Sixth Scale, as seen in Batman vs

Superman: Dawn of Justice. Coming soon, so check back for updates!”


  Post Attachments 
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Post #156650
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