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Posted 3/6/2017 9:18:32 AM
Supreme Being

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Holy firepower, Batman: The Batmobile has been upgraded
Original main gun module has been replaced with symmetrical 20-30mm 3-barrel chain guns.
These appear to be the same type used in the nose of some military helicopters.
I've always felt the new Batmobile was way under gunned with twin 50 calibers.
So, I will be incorporating this new weapon system into my B v S DOJ Batmobile build.

On Sunday, "Justice League" director Zack Snyder shared a photo of the Caped Crusader's cool ride on social media platform Vero, and someone seems to have spent a little time upgrading its firepower capabilities since last year's appearance in "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice."
And the director doesn't want to hear any complaints from a certain Gotham City billionaire.
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"Upgrades... what are you worried about Wayne," Snyder wrote in the photo caption. The famed Batmobile now has major weaponry built into the hood, so nobody better cut off Bruce Wayne (Ben Affleck) as he cruises to Starbucks on Saturday morning.
True Batmobile fanatics can compare the photo with this toy version covered by CNET last month when it appeared at Toy Fair.
Snyder's been generous about dropping "Justice League" tidbits lately.
Last week on Twitter, he shared a five second clip of Jason Momoa swimming underwater as Aquaman.
And his Vero post right before the Batmobile picture is of a modern, glass-walled structure, with the caption, "This is the Bruce Wayne house we built from scratch based on the Farnsworth House." (The Farnsworth House is an iconic one-room home-turned-museum in Illinois designed by noted architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.)


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Post #152391
Posted 3/6/2017 7:17:42 PM
Supreme Being

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Did a little more online research about this DOJ Batmobile upgrade. Apparently this has been known about for at least 6-months. There are models that show these upgrades at least 6-months ago. Not sure of these models origins. Could be custom scratch, modified existing, or even images of prototypes. vertigo

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Post #152400
Posted 3/9/2017 6:07:20 PM
Supreme Being

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Here is an outstanding book on universal problem solving techniques
and strategies written in easy to understand language that is well
suited to the needs of the Bat Vehicle planner and builder.

Print out the table of contents.
Mark beside the ones you have used.
You will find that you have already used many of those listed.

Engineering Problem-Solving 101: Time-Tested and Timeless Techniques
by Robert Messler

Provides detailed engineering analysis, and lays out versatile
problem-solving methodologies. Written by an "engineer who teaches,"
with more than 20 years of experience as a practicing engineer and
numerous awards for teaching engineering, this straightforward,
one-of-a-kind resource fills a long-vacant niche by identifying and
teaching the procedures necessary to address and resolve any problem,
regardless of its complexity. Engineering Problem-Solving 101:
Time-Tested and Timeless Techniques contains more than 50 systematic
approaches spanning all disciplines, logically organized into
mathematical, physical/mechanical, visual, and conceptual categories.
Strategies are reinforced with practical reference tables, technical
illustrations, interesting photographs, and real-world examples.

Table of Contents

1. Engineers as Problem Solvers

2. Problem-Solving Skills versus Process versus Techniques

3. Using Equations (Plug-and-Chug)

4. Approximating and Estimating

5. Interpolating and Extrapolating

6. Checking

7. Dimensional Analysis and Reconciling Units

8. Using Similarity and Ratios

9. Using Indexes or Indices

10. Scaling

11. Sensitivity Analysis (of Parameters)

12. Response Curves and Surfaces

13. Numerical Analysis and Methods

14. Dimensionless Quantities or Parameters

15. Assumptions, Constraints, Conditions, and Cases

C. PART TWO: Physical/Mechanical Approaches to Problem-Solving

16. Reverse Engineering

17. Material Property Correlations

18. Proof-of-Concept Models

19. Experimental Models and Model Experiments

20. Test Models and Model Testing

21. Mock-ups and Masters

22. Prototypes and Rapid Prototyping

23. Trial and Error

D. PART THREE: Visual, Graphic, or Iconic Approaches to Problem-Solving

24. Sketching and Rendering

25. Tracings and Transfers, Templates, Lofting and Lines-Taking

26. Graphing and Graphical Methods

27. Layouts

28. Flow Diagrams and Flowcharts

29. Causal Diagrams or Cause-and-Effect Diagrams

30. Decision Trees

E. PART FOUR: Conceptual or Abstract Approaches to Problem-Solving

31. Brainstorming: Process, Methodology, and Technique

32. Using Analogs

33. Dissecting Problems: Decoupling and Coupling, Zooming In and Zooming Out

34. Working Problems Backward and Inverse Problems

35. Functional Analysis and Black Boxes

36. Morphological Analysis and Morphological Charts

37. Storyboarding

38. Iteration and the Iterative Design Process

39. Closing Thoughts

40. Approximating and Estimating

41. Interpolating and Extrapolating

42. Checking

43. Dimensional Analysis and Reconciling UnitsIn Summary

44. Using Similarity and RatiosIn Summary

45. Using Indexes or Indices

46. Scaling

47. Sensitivity Analysis (of Parameters)

48. Response Curves and Surfaces

49. Numerical Analysis and Methods

50. Dimensionless Quantities or Parameters 51

51. Assumptions, Constraints, Conditions

52. Reverse Engineering

53. Material Property Correlations

54. Proof-of-Concept Models

55. Experimental Models and Model Experiments

56. Test Models and Model Testing

57. Mock-ups and Masters

58. Prototypes and Rapid Prototyping

59. Trial and Error

60. Sketching and Rendering

61. Tracings and Transfers, Templates, Lofting and Lines

62. Graphing and Graphical Methods

63. Causal Diagrams or Cause-and-Effect Diagrams
Post #152419
Posted 3/10/2017 6:35:02 PM
Supreme Being

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Last Login: Today @ 6:41:27 PM
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What is really important about this book is that 99.99 % of all engineering problems have been solved with these strategies and methods and that all these are contained inside one book. It is also relevant to solving problems across most specialties. From bridges to Bat Vehicles this book can contribute much to your problem solving methods and strategies. Used copies at Amazon run 33-50.00. vertigo
Post #152426
Posted 3/14/2017 6:45:58 PM
Supreme Being

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Last Login: Today @ 6:41:27 PM
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Here is the best wraparound face shield I have found.

I rarely use safety glasses or goggles anymore as my primary
protection since finding this product.

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Stray metal fragments from grinding and saws are still the number one
eye injury causes for workers in metal fabrication. Around 5-10% of
these are injured even though they are wearing safety glasses. Reason:
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entered from the non-protected sides and/or from above or below, when
the worker had their heads, tilted down or up, too much.
Additional worker eye injuries come from splashes and stray droplets
of fuels, oils, solvents, greases, paints, resins, chemicals, etc.
I also used mine when working on mills, lathes, metal cutting circular
cutting chop saws, etc.

Uvex WRAPAROUND FACESHIELD
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you cool and dry in hot environments. Easy-to-replace face shield
window can be changed in seconds. Meets ANSI Z87.1-2010. USA made.

These cost $35.65 for uncoated window and $51.20 for
Hardcoated/Anti-Fog window from Gemplers. Anyone who has worked for
some length of time with grinders, saws, routers, drills, sanders,
mills, lathes, etc., in wood, metal, plastics, resins, liquids, etc.,
can usual recall several near misses from damage to their eyes.
Wraparound Face Shields and/or goggles are CHEAP AT THE PRICE when you
really consider how much your eyes are worth to
you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


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Post #153448
Posted 3/23/2017 7:52:48 PM
Supreme Being

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Last Login: Today @ 6:41:27 PM
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I placed a copy of this post here because it may be of some use to
someone doing a Bat Vehicle build or planning to do a Bat Vehicle
build.

Based on my collective research and study, so far, of the Batman v
Superman Batmobile it appears the easiest way to build this Bat
Vehicle with the least amounts of man hours and expense is to build
the body first completely in wood.

An alternative to building the body in wood is to use one of the 3D
available programs to have the vehicle routed life-size in foam. This
would be a great way to go but the lowest price I found to have this
done is 12,500.00 delivered to my door.

The next step is to find a donor vehicle, with the title, could be a
car but most likely a truck, conforming closely to logical body
attachment points.

After acquiring a suitable donor vehicle, one would probably fabricate
a frame around the donor vehicle that matches the bottom edges of the
wood body and weld in additional braces as needed.

Once the wood body fits on the donor vehicle frame then the builder
will have two choices. Remove the wood body, build a frame on the
lower frame, attach the body panels that have been translated into
steel or other materials, and join together. The second choice is to
remove the wood body and translate it into steel or other materials
with the end result being a bolt on body, probably with a few modules,
that can be taken, on or off, at will.

Completing these steps should get you to approximately 80% completion.
   vertigo
Post #153519
Posted 3/25/2017 8:17:11 PM
Supreme Being

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Last Login: Today @ 6:41:27 PM
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Here is a method I am considering for my build.
One method used by a friend of mine who has worked in metal sculpture for 40 years might prove viable in building the Batman v Superman DOJ Batmobile body.
SKIN and BURN is his name for the method but the method has been documented to have been used for more than two-thousand years in art and construction, etc,....
I am currently thinking about using it in my DOJ Batmobile build.
Here is how SKIN and BURN would work on the DOJ body.
Build the body and other pieces in wood, cardboard, or foam.
Cut steel pieces, fit to wood body, and secure with adhesive. Repeat procedure until all translated metal pieces are attached. Then use a MIG welder with a dwell timer set to 1/4 to 1/2 second on high heat. Same welding method is sometimes used by custom exhaust welders. Tactical welding techniques must be used to avoid distortion effects. The wood is then burned out slowly or cut away inside in pieces. I probably would cut away the wood so I could weld inside as I cut away the wood pieces.
Cut steel pieces, fit to foam body, and secure with adhesive. Repeat procedure until all translated metal pieces are attached. Then use a MIG welder with a dwell timer set to 1/4 to 1/2 second on high heat. Same welding method is sometimes used by custom exhaust welders. Tactical welding techniques must be used to avoid distortion effects. The foam is then dissolved with solvent, but could be burned out slowly or cut away inside in pieces. I probably would use solvent.
If a 3D routed 1:1 foam Batmobile didn't cost 12,500.00 I could embrace the foam method. vertigo
Post #153537
Posted 4/7/2017 8:27:11 PM
Supreme Being

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Last Login: Today @ 6:41:27 PM
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Put a copy of this post here as this information may be of use to others that might be considering/planning a DOJ bat vehicle build.
"I've been thinking about the idea of using a donor. So here's an idea
I would like to run past the mechanic/car builder gurus here.
What if:
You take a pick up and strip it down.
Keep the motor, transmission, etc. intact
Take the suspension and switch it around so that the steering is
opposite the motor. The frame humps up in the rear so that may need to
be modified.
Now you have the motor in the back like it needs to be. Put in a
V-drive transfer case and run the driveshaft back alongside the
engine.
Attach swing arms to the end of the frame and attach the rear axle and
suspension components to that.
Might need to cut and reform the frame in the front, but I think it
might be an easy way to get the car to be rear engine.
Please, give me any thoughts. Positive or negative?"

I think this is an excellent idea. Over the past month, or so, I
pretty much have come to almost exactly the same set of conclusions.
Thinking about this so much is why I have not jumped in and torn my
donor vehicle down yet. This method has been done before successfully.
I read about it being done in other types of build forums but they
didn’t have any photo images posted and they only generalized about
how they completed their conversions. I have been searching the web
for books on these “switch conversions” but have yet to find one.

Also currently studying low profile engines that could be mounted in the front that would allow for conventional driveshaft arrangements. High performance Subaru, VW, Porsche, Boxer, etc. engines have
definite possibilities as do various small and medium size bus
engine/transaxle systems. Also looking at some of the modular building techniques. vertigo
Post #154595
Posted 4/7/2017 8:37:49 PM
Supreme Being

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Last Login: Today @ 6:41:27 PM
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I put a copy of this post here because it might be of some benefit to others
considering/planning a Bat vehicle build.

Might have to weight the front end on this vehicle a little to move the center of balance forward a little, so as to off-set some of the stability and potentially lethal characteristic issues?

Rear-Engine, rear mounted engines, and rear-wheel-drive layout.
The disadvantage to a rear weight bias is that the car can become
unstable and tend to over-steer.

In turns, this tendency is much more pronounced, to the point that
even letting off the throttle slightly while turning can cause the
rear tires to suddenly lose grip, and the vehicle to slide rear-first
(see lift-off over-steer).

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

RR layout

“In automotive design, an RR, or Rear-engine, Rear-wheel-drive layout
places both the engine and drive wheels at the rear of the vehicle. In
contrast to the RMR layout, the center of mass of the engine is
between the rear axle and the rear bumper.

Most of the traits of the RR configuration are shared with the
mid-engine rear-wheel-drive, or MR. Placing the engine near the driven
rear wheels allows for a physically smaller, lighter, less complex,
and more efficient drivetrain, since there is no need for a
driveshaft, and the differential can be integrated with the
transmission, commonly referred to as a transaxle. The front-engine
front-wheel-drive layout also has this advantage.

Since the engine is typically the heaviest component of the car,
putting it near the rear axle usually results in more weight over the
rear axle than the front, commonly referred to as a rear weight bias.
The farther back the engine, the greater the bias. Typical weight bias
for an FR (front engine, rear drive), is 55/45 front/rear; for MR,
45/55; for RR, 35/65. Rear weight bias reduces forward weight transfer
under braking, and increases rear weight transfer under acceleration.
The former means that traction is more evenly distributed among all
four wheels under braking, resulting in shorter stopping times and
distances. The latter means that the driven wheels have increased
traction when accelerating, allowing them to put more power on the
ground and accelerate faster.

The disadvantage to a rear weight bias is that the car can become
unstable and tend to oversteer when decelerating (whether braking or
lifting off the throttle). In turns, this tendency is much more
pronounced, to the point that even letting off the throttle slightly
while turning can cause the rear tires to suddenly lose grip, and the
vehicle to slide rear-first (see lift-off oversteer). When this
happens, rotational inertia dictates that the added weight away from
the axis of rotation (generally the steering wheels) will be more
likely to maintain the spin, especially under braking. This is an
inherent instability in the design, making it easier to induce and
more difficult to recover from a slide than in a less
rear-weight-biased vehicle. All cars, regardless of drivetrain layout,
obey the same laws of physics and can do this, but it is much easier
to do and harder to correct in MR and RR vehicles.

When not braking, the decreased weight over the front wheels means
less traction, resulting in the car having a tendency to understeer,
which is safer and more stable (further allowing a driver to get on
full throttle sooner) but is undesirable in cornering. To counteract
this, it is necessary to induce forward weight transfer to increase
front grip, but this significantly destabilizes the car and can be
hard to do properly, that is, without spinning. High-performance
driving necessitates inducing weight transfer, regardless of
drivetrain layout, but it is more important in MR and especially RR
layouts, and the greater effect from it is more difficult to handle.

In these respects, an RR can be considered to be an exaggeration of MR
- harder braking, faster and earlier acceleration, and increased
oversteer, but faster turning if it can be controlled.

In off road and low-traction situations, the RR layout has some
advantages compared to other 2WD layouts. The weight is biased towards
the driven wheels- as with FF vehicles. This both improves drive-wheel
traction and reduces the tendency for the undriven wheels to dig in.
In addition, the driving and steering requirements are split between
front and rear- as with FR vehicles- making it less likely for either
to lose traction. Many dune buggies successfully use a Volkswagen
beetle as the donor car for this reason. The relative simplicity and
light weight compared to 4WD can therefore sometimes outweigh the
disadvantage of only having two driven wheels.

Where RR differs from MR is in that the engine is located outside the
wheelbase. The major advantage of MR - low moment of inertia - is
negated somewhat (though still lower than FR), and there is more room
for passengers and cargo (though usually less than FR). Furthermore,
because both axles are on the same side of the engine, it is
technically more straightforward to drive all four wheels, than in a
mid-engine configuration (though there have been more high-performance
cars with the M4 layout than with R4). Finally, a rear-mounted engine
has empty air (often at a lower pressure) behind it when moving,
allowing more efficient cooling for air-cooled vehicles (more of which
have been RR than liquid-cooled, such as the Volkswagen Beetle, and
one of the few production air-cooled turbocharged cars, the Porsche
930).

For liquid-cooled vehicles, however, this layout presents a
disadvantage, since it requires either increased coolant piping from a
front-mounted radiator (meaning more weight and complexity), or
relocating the radiator(s) to the sides or rear, and adding air
ducting to compensate for the lower airflow at the rear of the car.

Due to the handling difficulty, the need for more space efficiency,
and the near ubiquitous use of liquid-cooled engines in modern cars,
most manufacturers have abandoned the RR layout. The major exception
is Porsche, who has developed the 911 for over 40 years and has taken
advantage of the benefits of RR while mitigating its drawbacks to
acceptable levels, lately with the help of electronic aids.
Post #154597
Posted 4/10/2017 6:06:01 PM
Supreme Being

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Last Login: Today @ 6:41:27 PM
Posts: 1,169, Visits: 2,233
This is an old post re-posted that is still relevant to the design,
planning, and building of Bat Vehicles.

TOP FIVE STRONGEST AND MOST RELIABLE AXLES

A listing I found in an article on off-road vehicle building

1. Full-floating Dana 135
The Dana 135 is found in some Ford F-550 medium-duty trucks and
motorhomes. It features a removable third member like a Toyota or Ford
9-inch. However, its size is more on par with an 18-wheeler rear axle.
The massive size and heavy-duty design make it undesirable for all but
the biggest-tired Jeep swaps.

2. Full-floating Dana 80
This is the step into medium-duty truck axles. The Dana 80 is more
axle than most people will ever need. There are plenty of ratios
available that range from 3.31:1 to 5.38:1 and a good number of
aftermarket differentials.

3. Full-floating Dana 70
The Dana 70 is another member of the cheap beef squad. However, there
are several versions making them more difficult to identify. Look for
the Dana 70U or 70HD. These feature desirable 1 1/2-inch, 35-spline
shafts. There are also plenty of ratios and a good number of
aftermarket differentials available for these versions of the 70 as
well. They are often found in 1-ton Dodge, Ford, and GM trucks, vans,
and even some tractors and heavy equipment.

4. Full-Floating GM 14-bolt
The 14-bolt is the king of cheap beef when running tires up to and
more than 44 inches tall. You can't deny the strength of the 10
1/2-inch ring gear, huge 30-spline pinion, and 1 1/2-inch, 30-spline
axleshafts. It also enjoys a decent number of aftermarket gear ratios
and differentials. The fact that it has a removable pinion support and
spanner adjustable backlash makes 14-bolt gear and differential swaps
relatively easy. It can be found in GM 3/4- and 1-ton trucks and vans
in a few different widths. It's often found in wrecking yards for less
than $200 because it's so common. Perhaps it’s only real weakness is
the thin tinfoil-like diff cover.

5. Full-floating 35-spline Dana 60
They enjoy plenty of aftermarket support because they use common Dana
60 gears and carriers. However, they're very uncommon, and you're not
likely to find one in a wrecking yard. Many 35-spline 60 rear axles
have been converted from 30-spline housings.
Post #154614
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